2C-B

2C-B (4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine) is a psychedelic drug of the 2C family. It was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin in 1974.

As a recreational drug, 2C-B is sold as a white powder sometimes pressed in tablets or gel caps. It is also referred to by a number of street names.

The drug is usually taken orally, but can also be insufflated or vaporized.

2C-B first became popularized in the United States as a short-lived substitute for the street drug Ecstasy when MDMA became illegal in 1985. Many 2C-B users are young adults who attend raves. Though 2C-B is still used in the rave subculture, commonly mistaken for and/or sold as Ecstasy, its intentional use has become more common in the 2000s.

Street prices range between $10 and $30 per tablet in the United States in 2011 when purchased in small quantities. Larger retail purchases cost between $200 and $500 per gram. Wholesale purchases of 2C-B can lower the price ($100 to $300 per gram in 2001, $30 to $100 on the darknet in 2020).

A powder which has been dyed pink may be sold as “tucibi”, “tussi” or “pink cocaine”. This is not synonymous with 2C-B and instead refers to a mixture of drugs with pink dye. It is very rare for tusi to contain 2C-B, with the most common ingredients being ketamine, MDMA, and caffeine.

In the United States, 2C-B is classified as CSA Schedule I Section (d) Subsection (3) 4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine.

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